Starting with the motor

I’ve introduced you all to the new project truck and we knew the first thing that had to happen was the engine needed an overhaul.  So we’ve pulled the engine, got it on an engine stand in the shop and have started the disassembly process.

got it out!
got it out!

We used an engine hoist and now the engine has been transferred to an engine stand.

We had a cheap load balancer on this pull and it helped to get the engine over the front core support
We had a cheap load balancer on this pull and it helped to get the engine over the front core support

I’m taking my time and really looking this engine over as I wanted to satisfy my curiosity about where my antifreeze was disappearing to!  As with most engines the head gaskets can over time begin to leak and this can allow coolant to seep, or to be sucked, into the nearby cylinders.  These leaks can be large or small, but cause several tale tale signs to happen when the engine runs.

For the 1 year I’ve owned the ’67 F100 pickup, I’ve noticed how the right tail pipe will smoke more than the left (they were both smoking some (blue smoke), but the right one (passenger side in the US) was really smoking worse and it was a white smoke sometimes like thick condensation smoke that you see in cooler weather from most car’s exhaust pipes.

In addition there was the constant need to refill the radiator; often adding a pint or so of fluid at  at time to return the level back to full.  Lastly, the top radiator hose would balloon up and get super tight as if it were under tremendous pressure.  I know the radiator cap would let the pressure go if it got too bad, but what was happening was the cylinder was pumping steam into the water jacket of the engine via the leaking head gasket and this steam was ballooning up the top hose.  I often would grab the lower hose during these times and the bottom hose was only warm to the touch.  I think the radiator will have to be reworked as well and may not have been flowing perfectly.

All this leads to a busted head gasket!  So in this video, I try to capture some footage of the various tear-down steps to see those heads, the gaskets and the block surfaces where they all come together.  I discover a few more things in the process…. let’s just say it was a good time for this engine to come out for some much needed attention.  Check it out and stay tuned for the next video where we continue the process.  Take care, Clay